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Planetary Boundaries

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  1. Biodiversity - Unlocking natural capital value for Australian investors

    Commissioned by the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors (ACSI), this report has been produced to support the Australian investment community's understanding of how biodiversity loss presents a risk to their portfolios. It provides recommendations about actions that Australian investors can take in response to this risk, in preparation for the Taskforce for Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD).
  2. Winning without win-win? Recommendations on financial market strategies for biodiversity and nature

    19 July 2021
    Expert recommendations for investors regarding financial market strategies to address urgent risks in biodiversity and nature, including examples of meaningful market actions and critique of 'win-win' thinking in investment decision-making. Recommendations drawn from a private cross-sectoral dialogue hosted by Preventable Surprises in February 2021.
  3. The economics of biodiversity: The Dasgupta review

    The Dasgupta Review analyses the economics of biodiversity. It makes the case for the natural environment as our most precious asset and argues for the need to account for nature in economics.
  4. Relationship-to-profit: A theory of business, markets, and profit for social ecological economics

    Supporting post-growth transformation, this doctoral thesis posits a new theory: relationship-to-profit theory. This explains the social and ecological implications of how businesses relate to profit, and argues that for economies to be sustainable businesses and markets should treat profit as a means rather than an end-in-itself.
  5. Climate-related risk scenarios for the 2050s: Exploring plausible futures for aquaculture and fisheries in New Zealand

    Adopting an organisational risk lens, this report explores the potential extent and interconnectedness of climate-related impacts to New Zealand Fisheries through two, alternate scenarios (reflecting 2ºC and 4ºC of global warming) set in the year 2050. The report aims to support strategic decision making about sustainable utilisation of New Zealand's ocean resources.
  6. Bankrolling extinction: The banking sector's role in the global biodiversity crisis

    6 January 2020
    This report explores the contribution of the banking sector to the biodiversity crisis and the destruction of nature as of 2019. The report ranks the 50 largest banks globally based on their financing of unethical operations, finding a large impact on deforestation, ecosystem destruction and overfishing.
  7. The race of our lives revisited

    GMO
    31 August 2018
    GMO's founder and long-term investment strategist, Jeremy Grantham, offers a wide-ranging analysis of interconnected environmental crises, explores solutions and makes recommendations for investors. The paper covers climate change, population growth, soil erosion and toxicity. It concludes by making the case for environmental investment strategies and fossil fuel divestment.
  8. Planetary boundaries: Guiding human development on a changing planet

    13 February 2015
    The planetary boundaries concept presents a set of nine planetary boundaries within which humanity can continue to develop and thrive for generations to come; a 'safe operating space'. Crossing these boundaries increases the risk of generating large-scale abrupt or irreversible environmental changes.
  9. Planetary boundaries: Exploring the safe operating space for humanity

    31 December 2009
    The nine planetary boundaries offer an approach to global sustainability where humanity can safely operate and avoid major human-induced environmental change on a global scale. The article argues that three of the planetary boundaries are already transgressed, including: climate change, biodiversity loss and the global nitrogen cycle.